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Frequently Asked Questions

Restaurant Operations Overview: What You Need to Know

All tasks in a restaurant are interconnected. For example, kitchen managers rely on software to let them know how much expected inventory they have in stock. Inventory was ordered based on par levels, which are set based on sales forecasts, which are in turn determined by how many guests you'll serve and what they'll order.

The list goes on and on, but the point is that if something goes wrong in a restaurant's plan, it might only be a matter of time before the domino effect kicks in and has an impact on your guests, your staff, and your bottom line.

That's why restaurateurs rely on restaurant operations. With clearly defined and enforced restaurant operations, restaurants achieve maximum efficiency and profitability. With this efficiency, staff knows exactly what to do and when to do it, and guests enjoy a delightful experience with your brand.

But the term itself is broad enough to impose a simple yet essential question: what exactly is the concept of restaurant operations?

This post will help you understand what restaurant operations can do for your establishment, the circumstances when focusing on this area can be the most impactful, and how you can improve your restaurant's operations.

What Does Restaurant Operations Mean?

The term ‘restaurant operations' refers to the process by which a restaurant is run. Any time there is a set way of doing something in the restaurant, it falls under the category of restaurant operations. The term can refer to the logistics of any and all tasks in a restaurant, including its finances, its kitchen, its staff, and its service model. For successful implementation of these processes, restaurants often rely on tools for accountability and optimization, including technology, templates, systems, and planners.

Areas of restaurant operations

While restaurant operations touch every corner of running a restaurant, here are the areas where having restaurant standard operating procedures can make your job a lot easier.

Ultimately, every decision made in a restaurant boils down to finances.

Portion control in the kitchen saves on inventory, which helps keep the restaurant profitable. On the other hand, skimping on ingredients increases the likelihood that a guest won't come back – and may even tell others not to do the same. Regardless, this situation would result in a negative impact on the restaurant's finances.

More concretely, a restaurant should have a financial plan in place, and be prepared to address the following questions:

  • How and where is the restaurant's profitability and revenue recorded?
  • Does the restaurant outsource any financing or accounting work?
  • How is the restaurant's budget broken down between key expenses like food costs, labor, and fixed costs?

Some tools that help out in this area include restaurant accounting software, as well as processes that restrict profit loss like portion control and employee scheduling software that promotes time clocking integrity.

Nestled under the umbrella of restaurant financing are the practices of purchasing and ordering. For a restaurant to operate efficiently, it needs to be stocked up with the right amount of inventory – however, it can't be so stocked up that food waste becomes an issue.

Regarding operations, restaurants tend to utilize sales forecasts to polish their purchasing and ordering processes. By relying on historical sales data, you can get a better grasp on how many of which menu items might be sold in a given day, month, holiday, or season.

  •  

Adhering to restaurant operations is paramount when handling time-sensitive tasks – which often means the physical work it takes to keep the restaurant efficient. For example, restaurant accounting can largely be delegated to software with some extra manual work from the manager and/or owner, but every single day in the restaurant:

  • Inventory arrives and needs to be put in the right place by the right people.
  • Food stations, dining room tables, and counters need to be functional and sanitary at the beginning of each shift.
  • Tables and surfaces need to be cleaned frequently so customers don't have to wait too long (and can feel safe when dining at your restaurant).

These are the areas where standard operating procedures (SOPs) are essential. Below are some of the more common areas of restaurant operations management that should be mastered as soon as possible.

Once the inventory levels are set during the purchasing and ordering stage, restaurants need a plan in place for receiving and storing food before it's prepped for guests. Managers need to have a process for getting needed inventory into the restaurant, and must know:

  • Where the food is coming from, as in which vendors and inventory suppliers.
  • When inventory shipments will arrive, as in which days of the week and which time of the day.
  • Who is responsible for moving the inventory to the right storage and preservation space in the back-of-house when it arrives.

Employees should also be briefed on all storage matters. For example, when new batches of perishables arrive, should they be placed behind any older deliveries to ensure the restaurant follows the first-in, first-out inventory method?

Tools used by restaurants to develop this process include inventory software and checklists for when deliveries arrive.

Each shift tends to be bookended with cleanup from the previous shift and preparation for the next one. Restaurant operators need to plan out which tasks need to be done, when they should be done, and who the best people to do them are.

For example, during the 3-5 pm time frame, cleanup might include a thorough cleaning of kitchen areas by the BOH team and a floor sweeping and sanitization of tables in the front of the house. For prep, cooks would restock their work stations and FOH staff might prep tables and utensils for the first dinner guests.

Typically, restaurants rely on checklists to ensure all tasks are complete on a daily or shift-by-shift basis. Checklists come in handy in all phases of restaurant operations, but given the justified sensitivity around food safety, it's inexcusable to miss the mark on health and cleanliness. Task management apps can also simplify the creating and tracking of checklists.

Customer service can make or break a guest experience. Customers are more likely to speak about their experiences with others when they're negative, as only about one in four consumers would stay silent about a negative interaction with a business. This word-of-mouth effect could turn people away from your restaurant before they've even tried your food.

This means you should have a customer service strategy that focuses on delighting your customers at every turn – and that everyone in your staff should know these best practices.

For instance, do you have a process in place for when a guest demands a refund, even though it appears there is nothing wrong with his order? What about when the server enters the wrong order in the POS and doesn't realize it until they get to the table? Having a clear, customer-focused resolution to these common problems can create a perfect guest experience with excellent customer service – and safely salvage it if something falls short of expectations.

A restaurant's service model might seem straightforward – after all, how complicated is it to greet guests, take their orders, bring them their food, and drop off the check?

The short answer: this process is extremely variable and based on the restaurant's concept. A high-end steak house emphasizes a level of formality and professionalism that would seem confusing at a small-town neighborhood diner.

For example, at a casual family restaurant, the service model might look like this:

  1. The host greets the party and seats them.
  2. Within three minutes of seating, the server acknowledges the party, greets themselves, and then takes a drink order as soon as possible.
  3. Upon returning with drinks, servers ask if the party is ready to order. If so, the server takes it and sends it to the kitchen ASAP by entering it into the POS.
  4. At least once before the food arrives, the server stops by the table to see if guests need anything, like a refill or more bread.
  5. The server or food runner brings the food to the table and asks if the guests need anything for their meals.
  6. The server checks in every five-ten minutes to see if the guests need anything while eating.
  7. Once everyone appears to be finished, the server asks if they can clear off the table, get to-go boxes, or if anything else is needed before the check.
  8. The server drops off the check and returns to the table within five minutes to close the tab.
  9. The server returns with the guests' change or credit card receipt, thanks the guests, and says they look forward to seeing the guests again.

Naturally, this model will vary at a different restaurant concept, and would even differ at this same restaurant for takeout and delivery orders. It's worth outlining the service model steps for all order types in your restaurant and ensuring your staff is familiar with them. That way, it will be easier to spot opportunities for improving operations in the service process.

Recruiting, hiring, onboarding, scheduling, engaging, paying, and losing employees all surface up into restaurant HR management.

The turnover rates in restaurants are infamously high. On average, a given employee stays at a restaurant for less than two months – and it costs nearly $6,000 every time it happens. Restaurants need an operating model in place to ensure the right employees are hired, well-trained, actively engaged, feeling productive, and ultimately retained for as long as possible.

Hiring

Having an operations strategy for hiring means developing and sticking to a proactive and proven method for posting job availability, actively recruiting top talent, and making speedy and competitive offers to the right candidates.

To expedite the hiring process, restaurants may decide to:

  • Use hiring software or post open roles on restaurant job boards.
  • Offer an employee referral bonus program to incentive peer-driven applications.
  • Hold frequent walk-in interview days to consistently source interested applicants.

It's also easy for the actual hiring process to be dragged out – selecting an applicant, making an offer, negotiating pay, and running background checks might take more than a week. Again, hiring software (or at the very least – an abundance of communication with candidates) tends to make this less of an issue.

Training

Staff training needs to strike a delicate balance of being welcoming and informative. New hires need to feel that they made the right choice by accepting your offer, but also that they know exactly what is expected of them in the role.

Larger restaurants and groups might have a training class for new hires, while independent businesses might sit down with new hires one-on-one and go over the restaurant's employee handbook. Either way, restaurants benefit from a documented employee training manual to ensure a universal yet customizable approach to new hire onboarding.

Scheduling

Scheduling work shifts is an often overlooked cog in restaurant operations. If a restaurant is understaffed, guests have to wait longer for service and employees feel overworked. If it is overstaffed, the business wastes money on unnecessary labor.

Either way, the restaurant loses money due to the ramifications of improper scheduling.

That's why many restaurant operators rely on restaurant scheduling software to build demand-based schedules and allow employees to submit availability and trade approved shifts, keeping the restaurant optimally staffed at all times.

Restaurant Operations Improvement Tips

Restaurant operations should be in a state of constant analysis and improvement – but changes should never prohibit employees from doing their jobs or guests from enjoying their dining experience.

Here are a few ways to ensure restaurant operations are monitored, analyzed, and improved upon in a purposeful and productive way.

Chances are, your restaurant has an operations plan in place. Everytime you find yourself following a habitual way of doing things – from cooking a specific dish to interacting with guests in a certain way – you're adhering to your restaurant operations.

Ideally, your restaurant would have these processes outlined in a restaurant operating manual, which is periodically revisited to consider which approaches, technologies, or systems could be adjusted or added to improve the status quo of the business.

A more cohesive staff works better together, but to get to that place, you'll need to emphasize employee communication. The line of communication can be opened through a restaurant team communication tool, but supplemental best practices should be implemented as well.

For example, consider:

  • Integrating pre-shift meetings for the FOH and BOH crews to interact with each other before each shift.
  • Offering continuous training and education to employees, or partnering up newer hires with an experienced staff mentor.
  • Encouraging shift swaps (when approved) for employees to collaborate with teams from different shifts.

Put simply, an engaged workforce equates to a more productive workforce. Highly engaged employees will generate 147% more profit than employees who are not as engaged. This happens because motivated employees are more likely to feel appreciated, take pride in their work, and feel incentivized to provide an optimal experience for customers.

Employee engagement can be improved in a myriad of ways – from practices employee gamification, to offering professional development opportunities, to utilizing employee engagement software. By investing in these areas, your employees will pay you back with a highly efficient operation.

Restaurants in the United States spend an estimated $162 billion on wasted foodannually – and anything that your restaurant is contributing to that amount is already too much.

By reducing food waste, you'll see a direct impact on your bottom line due to more accurate menu pricing, inventory purchasing, and ingredient portioning. This ensures that as much inventory as possible ends up on a customer's plate.

Again, restaurants can use an inventory management software to keep track of expected versus actual inventory levels to see where variance and spillage are the most severe, then put guardrails in place to reduce waste.

Other Questions

A restaurant operations manager is the individual most responsible for ensuring the restaurant operates at maximum efficiency – specifically for all aspects of the business that have set rules and processes. While larger restaurants and multi-location businesses might have a dedicated individual or team for restaurant operations management, the responsibilities tend to fall to the shift manager, general manager, or even the owner in small restaurants, who must perform operations management work on top of their normal duties.

A control system is a process that yields a desired outcome – such as always having a certain ingredient stocked in the kitchen. Usually automated through software and technology, a control system either takes action (or alerts someone to take action) to reach that outcome. For example, an inventory control system might alert you when a popular item is running low to ensure there's enough of it for an upcoming shift. Control systems are outcome-focused and ensure the restaurant's operations strategy remains results-oriented.

A restaurant operations checklist can be made by typing out all of the categories where a restaurant task may fall (finances, staffing, customer service) in a document or spreadsheet. From there, individual tasks in each of these areas should be listed out under these categories. Optionally, the person/team responsible for the task, the time it should be completed, and how often it should be done can also be listed out. To get you started, we've included a restaurant operations overview checklist for free download here.

Restaurant operations might seem like a bigger concept than you had initially thought – and that's true. The process of optimizing restaurant operations has a positive impact on every single aspect of your restaurant, so get to work on choosing the right technology and implementing the best processes to improve your restaurant operations.

Alcohol Act

The Alcohol Act is one of the most important laws for the catering industry. You need a license if you sell alcoholic beverages in your business. Do you have everything in order? Would you like to know more about the furnishing requirements for your company or tips on how to deal with redistribution to minors? We tell you more about it.

From what age can young people serve alcohol to guests? And are there separate employment conditions for them? KHN answers!

16 and 17 year olds

Although this group of young people are not allowed to order alcohol themselves, 16 and 17-year-olds are allowed to work in a cafe or restaurant and serve all kinds of drinks to guests. This applies to both students and regular employees. Of course you should keep an eye on the Working Hours Act if you employ young people.

Under the age of 16 in most cases not

On the basis of the Licensing and Catering Act, young people under the age of 16 are not allowed to work in the area where alcohol is served. There is an exception for 14 and 15 year olds who have to do an internship as part of their education. In that case they are allowed to work in the area where alcohol is served and therefore also serve alcohol themselves.

Overview by age

Separate rules apply for the type of work, rest and maximum working time for each age. Look in the overview to see which guidelines the employer must adhere to.

Wages

The minimum youth wage applies to young people between the ages of 15 and 22. You will find the wage tables on the KHN website . Note: According to the Minimum Wage and Minimum Holiday Allowance Act, you are obliged to pay the net statutory minimum wage to the employee in cash.

Holidays

Young people or young people are also entitled to holidays and holiday pay. You can calculate this as a supplement in the wages. You must then include this in the employment contract and have it reflected on the pay slip. The percentage for the accrual of vacation days in the wage is 10.64 percent. You pay a surcharge of 8 percent for the holiday allowance.

fine

If you violate the rules, you as an employer risk a fine imposed by the Labor Inspectorate. Depending on the seriousness of the violation, this fine is at least 200 euros per violation.

Tips

  • You can conclude an employment contract for holiday employees for a definite period of time, for example for the duration of a holiday period or the season. At the end of this period, this expires by operation of law. See khn.nl/cao for examples of these agreements.
  • If you have entered into a contract of 6 months or longer: pay attention to the notice period.
  • You cannot agree a trial period with a contract of less than 6 months.

Ask?

Do you want to know more? Please contact the advisors of KHN Advies via 0348 48 94 89 or by e-mail: khnadvies@khn.nl .

Does the age limit also apply to non-alcoholic beer? That depends on the percentage of alcohol in the beer.

Is the alcohol percentage 0.5% by volume or lower? Then this is seen as alcohol-free in the Licensing and Catering Act. You can therefore also give this to young people under the age of 18.

NB! Some low-alcohol beers contain more than 0.5% alcohol by volume. If in doubt, look at the packaging.

Can you organize a bingo as a catering entrepreneur? And can an association hold a bingo in your business? And does it still matter what prizes there are to win? KHN provides answers and advice.

And rules about bingo are included in both the Alcohol Act and the Gambling Act.

Rules according to the Alcohol Act

According to the Alcohol Act , no bingos and other games of chance (with the exception of slot machines) may take place in a catering facility. This means that no bingo may be organized in the areas where alcohol is normally served. It is irrelevant that no alcohol is served at the time of bingo.

So if you have a room in your company that is not listed as a catering location on the liquor and catering license, you can organize a bingo in that room.

Rules according to the Gambling Act

But not only the Alcohol Act says something about organizing bingos. The Gambling Act also sets rules for organizing bingo. These are:

  • The bingo is organized by a Dutch association (or foundation that hardly differs materially from an association) that has existed for at least 3 years.
  • The organizing association has a clear purpose described in its statutes, other than organizing bingos.
  • The value of the prizes may not exceed 400 euros per series. The value of the prizes may not exceed EUR 1550 per meeting.
  • The association must notify the municipality at least 14 days in advance.

In principle, minors may also participate in bingo, unless the municipality determines otherwise.

Ask?

Do you want to know more? Please contact KHN Advies on 0348 48 94 89 or send an email to khnadvies@khn.nl .

How many toilets should I have at least in my business? Does it matter if I serve alcohol? KHN provides answers and advice.

The Alcohol Act came into effect on 1 July 2021 . This replaces the Liquor and Catering Act. This also means new rules regarding toilets at companies that serve alcohol.

Fewer rules

With the arrival of the Alcohol Act, there are fewer rules regarding toilets. The Alcohol Act itself does not set any additional requirements for toilets. This means that the rules included in the Building Decree only apply.

Number of toilets

The basic rule for meeting functions (all catering except accommodation companies) is that every catering establishment has at least 2 toilets. For existing buildings, the exception is that 1 toilet is sufficient if a maximum of 25 people are dependent on it. For new buildings, 1 toilet is sufficient if a maximum of 15 people are dependent on it. New construction rules also apply to major renovations. The staff also counts in these numbers, unless you have a separate toilet for the staff; then you only count the guests. The above rules apply to both alcohol-providing companies and the “dry” catering industry.

Disabled toilet

Existing buildings do not have to have a special disabled toilet. In the case of new construction, alcohol-providing meeting functions (café, restaurant, cafeteria with Alcohol Act permit, etc.) must have a disabled toilet if the company is larger than 150 m2.

Ask?

Do you want to know more? Please contact the advisors of KHN Advies on 0348 48 94 89 or by email: khnadvies@khn.nl .

According to the Alcohol Act, a manager in the catering industry must be at least 21 years old. This is therefore also the minimum age limit to start a catering business. In addition, the manager must meet the requirements with regard to moral conduct.

This means that:

  • A supervisor may not be placed in a psychiatric hospital, or has been made available.
  • An executive who has not been irrevocably sentenced to an unconditional custodial sentence of more than six months for a crime within the last five years.
  • A manager who has not been irrevocably sentenced to an unconditional fine of 500 euros or more by more than 1 judgment within the last five years.

A manager may also not have been a manager in the past five years of an establishment whose license has been withdrawn on the basis of Article 31 of the Licensing and Catering Act or which has been closed for at least one month.

Can the SVH Social Hygiene exam be taken in another language? And is the study material available in multiple languages? KHN answers.

When you serve alcohol in your company, a Liquor and Catering License / Alcohol License is required. One of the requirements for obtaining this permit is having an SVH Social Hygiene statement.

The theory book Social Hygiene is available in the following languages

  • Dutch
  • English
  • Mandarin Chinese

The SVH Social Hygiene exam is offered in the following languages

  • Dutch
  • English
  • Mandarin Chinese
  • North African Arabic
  • Turkish

Other languages ​​are not offered. If a participant wants a separate language, this must be done in consultation with SVH. If the SVH cooperates, the translation costs will be charged directly and in full to the examination candidate. For more information, visit the website of the Horeca Professional Skills Foundation .

Are you looking for a trainer who can provide an English-taught Social Responsibility Course? HOC.nl offers this course both through open registration and in-house course at your own location. Members of KHN receive a 15% discount on tuition fees for all HOC.nl courses .

Knowing more?

Please contact the advisors of KHN Advies on 0348 48 94 89 or by email: khnadvies@khn.nl .

Do you have to pay for the addition of supervisors to the Liquor and Catering License / Alcohol License? Are these national rates? Or does this differ per municipality? KHN answers.

Yes, there are costs associated with adding supervisors to your Liquor and Catering License / Alcohol License. There are no fixed fees, these differ per municipality. You can find out how high the fees are in your municipality on the municipality's website or in the municipal fees ordinance.

KHN: Nationally determined rates

On January 1, 2014, the amended Liquor and Catering License came into effect. At the time, KHN asked for nationally determined rates, but this was not granted. Due to the option of crediting via a separate permit, a significant reduction in administrative burden has been achieved, in accordance with the wishes of the legislator. After all, this means that a completely new liquor and catering license no longer needs to be issued.

High rates

A municipality may charge a fee for issuing the new appendix, but the municipality may determine the level of the rates itself. In practice, there appear to be large differences in the fees.

Ask?

Do you want to know more? Please contact the advisors of KHN Advies on 0348 48 94 89 or by email: khnadvies@khn.nl .

Do you have to pay for the addition of supervisors to the Liquor and Catering License / Alcohol License? Are these national rates? Or does this differ per municipality? KHN answers.

Yes, there are costs associated with adding supervisors to your Liquor and Catering License / Alcohol License. There are no fixed fees, these differ per municipality. You can find out how high the fees are in your municipality on the municipality's website or in the municipal fees ordinance.

KHN: Nationally determined rates

On January 1, 2014, the amended Liquor and Catering License came into effect. At the time, KHN asked for nationally determined rates, but this was not granted. Due to the option of crediting via a separate permit, a significant reduction in administrative burden has been achieved, in accordance with the wishes of the legislator. After all, this means that a completely new liquor and catering license no longer needs to be issued.

High rates

A municipality may charge a fee for issuing the new appendix, but the municipality may determine the level of the rates itself. In practice, there appear to be large differences in the fees.

Ask?

Do you want to know more? Please contact the advisors of KHN Advies on 0348 48 94 89 or by email: khnadvies@khn.nl .

With the introduction of the Alcohol Act , a total of 3 parties can be fined if a minor (younger than 18 years) obtains alcohol in a catering establishment. Firstly, an entrepreneur can be fined if he/she sells alcohol without first checking whether someone is of the correct age. The fine can also be given if the young person is of the correct age, but has not checked this.

Secondly, the young person can be fined if he orders alcohol. You are not allowed to be in possession of alcohol under the age of 18.

redistribution

A new feature of the Alcohol Act is that the reseller can also be fined. This is the person who is of the right age to buy alcohol, but then passes it on to a minor. For example, consider a 19-year-old guy who orders two beers and gives one to his 17-year-old friend. Note: In this case, the entrepreneur can also be fined if this redistribution takes place in view of the employee who sells the alcohol.

House rules

To further discourage redistribution, you can include in house rules that guests over the age of 18 who knowingly pass on alcohol to young people, or young people under 18 who are found with alcohol, will be removed or an individual (or collective if you do so within the Collective Catering (CHO) agrees) to be denied.

It is also wise to include the fact that the police will be involved as standard with false IDs, and to make agreements about this with the police/municipality.

Do you want to install a slot machine in your catering business? Can that just happen? Which permits do you need? What requirements do you have to meet? KHN answers.

It depends on whether it is a slot machine or a skill machine.

With a skill machine:

  • Does the game result depend on the insight or dexterity of the player
  • Gives the machine free play only or an extended play time as a reward

For example, consider a pinball machine. You do not need a permit for this.

At a slot machine:

  • Does chance play a bigger role than dexterity or skill
  • If you win you can win money, premium or prizes

Think, for example, of a slot machine or automatic roulette. You need a license for a gaming machine.

license

The difference mainly lies in the fact that the player can win money or a premium with a gaming machine. You do not need a permit for a skill machine. For a slot machine, yes.

Attendance permit

If you want to place gaming machines in your business, you need an attendance permit. A permit is only issued to so-called 'high-threshold' establishments.

High-threshold' establishments

High-threshold establishments are cafes or restaurants that meet the following conditions:

  • The company is in possession of a valid Liquor and Catering Act license / Alcohol license
  • The company mainly caters to guests aged 18 and over
  • The cafe or restaurant visit stands on its own, there are no other activities that attract their own flow of visitors (such as in a bowling center)

A high-threshold catering company may place a maximum of two gaming machines if the permit has been granted.

The mayor is the licensing authority. A municipal ordinance determines for how many gaming machines per establishment a license is issued (with a maximum of two). That can differ per municipality.

Low-threshold establishments

Low-threshold companies such as a cafeteria, ice cream parlor or lunchroom cannot obtain an attendance permit. They are therefore not allowed to place a gaming machine. The current legislation does not provide a very clear picture of what is high and low-threshold, mainly due to case law. Nevertheless, we still see differences in the interpretation of the rules per municipality. If a permit is refused because your company is 'low-threshold' according to the municipality, it is therefore worth checking whether the argumentation of the municipality is correct.

Composite devices

Some companies have both a high-threshold and a low-threshold section. For example, a restaurant with a cafeteria section. These types of companies can issue a license for gambling machines if you meet the following conditions:

  • The vending machines are only placed in the high-threshold part
  • The two spaces are separated from each other
  • The visitors of the low-threshold part can enter this part without having to enter the high-threshold part

Do you own the gaming machine? Then you need an operating license

Are you the owner of the gaming machine? Then you must have a special operating permit. In most cases, the machine is not owned by the catering entrepreneur, but by an external company.

From what age can young people work for you? And is there a minimum age for employees to serve alcohol to guests? Which rules apply to you and your employees? KHN answers.

Young people are allowed to work from the age of 13, but there are rules about the type of work and how much they are allowed to work. The Working Hours Act (ATW) indicates which options you have and which rules you must adhere to. The law makes a distinction between children (younger than 16 years old) and young people (16 and 17 year olds). Children have limitations in time and work. There is a time limitation for young people. Below you will find an overview of the rules per age.

13 and 14 year olds

13 and 14 year olds are only allowed to work on non-school days and during holidays. They are not allowed to work on Sundays. Their work may only consist of 'non-industrial auxiliary work of a light nature'. This term includes, for example, auxiliary work in the catering industry, such as helping with the service and auxiliary work at, for example, a riding school, on a camping site, in a playground, in an amusement park, in a bowling center and in a museum.

Washing dishes with an automated dishwasher is soon seen as industrialized labor and that is not allowed. Keep in mind that cleaning products fall under hazardous substances and this age group is not allowed to work with them. To avoid the label of child labour, you must be able to demonstrate that you protect the safety, health and development of the child. This applies to both the work itself and the way in which the work is organised.

15 year olds

Children aged 15 are allowed to work more than 13 and 14 year olds:

  • On Saturday or Sunday*, not both in succession
  • Up to two hours on school days
  • Maximum 12 hours per school week
  • A maximum of 40 hours per holiday week
  • After 7 a.m. and before 7 p.m.**

* For Sunday work, 15-year-olds require express permission from their parents or guardians.
**During the holiday periods, 15-year-olds are allowed to work until 9 p.m.

A 15-year-old is allowed to perform (auxiliary) work in the catering industry, so no industrialized work. However, a 15-year-old is allowed to help the main dishwasher put the dishes away or perform light work in the kitchen, such as polishing and washing dishes by hand. They can also help set up the terrace or serve at a lunchroom or coffee shop.

NB!

According to the Drinks and Catering Act, children under the age of 16 are only allowed to work in a room where no alcoholic drinks are served. With the introduction of the Alcohol Act, there is only an exception for 14 and 15-year-olds who follow a (sniff) internship in the catering industry as part of their education. In that case, they may also work in the area where alcohol is served and also dispense alcohol themselves.

16 and 17 year olds

16 and 17 year olds have the following employment opportunities:

  • On Saturday AND Sunday, unless they have to go to school on the Friday before or the Monday after
  • Until 11 p.m
  • Up to 9 hours a day
  • Maximum 45 hours per week
  • An average of 40 hours per week over a period of four affiliated weeks
  • School time always counts as working time
  • When working a period of 7 consecutive days, they must have a rest period of at least 36 consecutive hours

Employees aged 16 and over are allowed to work in a cafe or restaurant and serve all kinds of drinks to guests. This applies to both students and regular employees. However, there must always be supervision by an adult expert when carrying out these activities. Also read: From what age can young people serve alcohol?

Working hours of young people

 

13 and 14 year olds

15 year olds

16 and 17 year olds

Per day
On school days
On non-school days
On holidays


No
Max. 6 hours
Max. 7 hours


max. 2 hours
Max. 8 hours
Max. 8 o'clock


Max 9 hours *
Max 9 hours
Max 9 hours

Per week
During school weeks
During holiday weeks


max. 12 hours
Max. 35 hours


max. 12 hours
Max. 40 hours


Max 45 hours*
Max. 45 hours

Working on Sunday?

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Yes, provided there is no work on Saturdays and/or vice versa. Parents/carers must give permission.

Yes.
Please note: when work is done on Saturday and Sunday, there may be no school time on the Friday immediately before or the Monday immediately after.

Rest
Per day
At least between
On holidays


2pm
7pm - 8am
7pm - 7am


12 noon
7pm - 7am
9pm - 7am


12 noon
11pm - 6am
11pm - 6am

Breaks
After every 4.5 hours of work


At least 30 minutes (continuous)


At least 30 minutes (continuous)


At least 30 minutes (continuous)

*The number of hours spent at school is also working time and must be included in the total number of hours.

Wages

The minimum youth wage applies to young people between the ages of 15 and 20. You will find the wage tables on the KHN website . Please note: according to the Minimum Wage and Minimum Holiday Allowance Act, you are obliged to pay the net statutory minimum wage to the employee in cash.

Holidays

Young people or young people are also entitled to holidays and holiday pay. You can calculate this as a supplement to the wage. You must then include this in the employment contract and have it reflected on the pay slip. The percentage for the accrual of vacation days in the wage is 10.64 percent. You pay a surcharge of 8.85 percent for the holiday allowance.

fine

If you violate the rules, you as an employer risk a fine imposed by the Labor Inspectorate. Depending on the seriousness of the violation, this fine is at least 200 euros per violation.

Tips

  • You can conclude an employment contract for holiday employees for a definite period of time, for example for the duration of a holiday period or the season. At the end of this period, this expires by operation of law. See khn.nl/cao for examples of these agreements.
  • If you have entered into a contract of 6 months or longer: pay attention to the notice period.
  • You cannot agree a trial period with a contract of less than 6 months.

Also read: Working Hours Act for young people and children

Ask?

Do you want to know more? Please contact the advisors of KHN Advies via 0348 48 94 89 or by e-mail: khnadvies@khn.nl .

When a catering company sells alcohol, social hygiene comes into play. But do all owners have to have a social hygiene statement? And does this also apply to your employees? KHN answers.

Social hygiene

The Alcohol Act prescribes that all managers in a catering company that sells alcohol must have a Statement of Knowledge and Insight into Social Hygiene. Managers are all persons for whose account and risk the Catering Business is conducted (the owners), the persons who have general management (for example the hotel manager) and the persons who are directly in charge (employees who are responsible at that time, this can also be a bartender who is only present during opening hours).

Exception

The Alcohol Act has one exception: no declaration of social hygiene is required if the manager is not involved in the management or operation of the company. In practical terms, this will only occur with the owner of the company, because the general management and direct management are present on the shop floor and therefore always involved in the operation.
To qualify for this exception, you must provide a statement to the mayor. The mayor will then assess whether this exceptional situation applies. The explanatory notes to the law do state that this is truly an exceptional situation and will not occur very often. A mayor will, among other things, check whether the manager has any influence on purchasing policy, setting prices, personnel policy, supervision of personnel, concluding agreements, etc. This occurs, for example, in international organizations where the owners are abroad. do not have to have social hygiene.

Discount on HOC . courses

As a member of KHN you receive a 15% discount on tuition fees for all courses at the Horeca Training Center ( www.hoc.nl ). For example, HOC offers an online crash course in social hygiene .

Read also

Which diplomas are required for me as a catering entrepreneur?

With the arrival of the new alcohol law, it is mandatory that the seller draws up a guaranteed method to ensure that the alcohol is only delivered to the address of the addressee and that the age (18+) of this person is determined.

If you want to outsource the delivery of alcohol to third parties, you as the seller remain responsible for compliance with the guaranteed working method. You must therefore include in the guaranteed working method how you inform the external deliverers about the applicable guaranteed working method, and you must also indicate the way in which you inform the deliverers. It is also important to include in the secured working method how the external partner informs and trains their employees on NIX18.

This example document on the guaranteed method of distance selling alcohol and the age limit describes how you can implement responsible distance selling in your catering business.

 

Working Conditions

All employees must be able to work safely and healthily. To ensure this is the Working Conditions Act (Arbowet). Employers and employees are jointly responsible for healthy and safe work and for the implementation of this law in their own business and in the catering industry. Do you have a question about working conditions? Check the most frequently asked questions and the answers on this page.

See also: Bedrijfshulpverlening (bhv)

Since 2017, the Working Conditions Act (Arbowet) and the conditions for health and safety care and prevention have changed. The Inspectorate SZW can impose a fine on a company whose contract with the health and safety service provider does not meet the legal requirements.

The Working Conditions Act has been changed since July 2017 in order to involve employers and employees more in the health and safety policy. The three most important changes for hospitality employers: the introduction of the basic contract, the requirements for occupational health and safety service providers and the position of the prevention officer. You must adjust the contracts and agreements with the health and safety service provider in accordance with changes in the law.

Avoid a fine

The Inspectorate SZW can impose a fine on a company whose contract with the health and safety service provider does not meet the legal requirements. Avoid a fine and make sure you have your contract with the health and safety service provider in order on time. Adjustments can be made by means of an addition to the existing contract or by concluding a new contract.

Introduction of mandatory basic contract

One of the most important changes is the introduction of the basic contract. You are obliged to be supported by an occupational health service provider for the following activities and to draw up a basic contract for this:

  1. Expert guidance in the event of illness.
  2. Testing the risk inventory and evaluation.
  3. Offering employees a periodic occupational health examination. This research is aimed at preventing/limiting the (health) risks associated with work as much as possible.
  4. Offering a preventive consultation. The employee must have the opportunity to go to the company doctor on his own initiative, even if there is no absenteeism.

Requirements for the practice of occupational health and safety service providers

In addition, requirements are set for the professional practice of health and safety service providers and company doctors. The following points are important to you as an employer and they must also be included in the basic contract with the health and safety service provider:

  1. The company doctor must be able to visit the workplace if he considers it necessary.
  2. The employee must be able to request a second opinion from another company doctor. The expert opinion at the UWV is still possible.
  3. The company doctor must have a complaints procedure.
  4. The company doctor (and the other occupational health and safety experts) must be able to consult with the employee representation.

Prevention officer clearer role

Every company must, now and also if the Working Conditions Act changes, appoint at least one employee as a prevention officer. In a company with 25 or fewer employees, the director/owner may be the prevention officer himself. The prevention officer has a clear role in the prevention and identification of health risks in the company. His task is to advise and collaborate with the company doctor and other health and safety service providers about working conditions in the company. In addition, the prevention officer supports the employer in completing the Risk Inventory and Evaluation and implementing the resulting measures.

The Works Council/Pvt has the right of consent when choosing the person of the prevention officer.

Download factsheet New Working Conditions Act

Download the New Working Conditions Act fact sheet for more information about the New Working Conditions Act.

Tip! With KHN Absenteeism you have arranged everything related to absenteeism due to illness in one go.

KHN Absenteeism is a combination of an affordable sickness absence insurance, with which the wages of sick employees are continued. And an absenteeism counter that takes all the worries off your hands regarding the guidance and reintegration of sick employees. In combination with the advantageous sickness absenteeism insurance, the absenteeism counter only costs 0.35% of the annual wage bill (excl. VAT). In that case you no longer need a separate health and safety service.

Ask?

Do you want to know more? Please contact the advisors of KHN Advies via 0348 48 94 89 or email khnadvies@khn.nl.

A periodic medical examination (PMO) is an occupational health (profession-related) examination that an employer offers to employees periodically (e.g. annually or biennially). A PMO is not an inspection, but provides insight into the health risks and how you can limit them by taking preventive measures at individual or company level.

Mandatory offer PMO

There is a legal obligation to offer employees a periodic medical examination. This obligation is stated in the Working Conditions Act (Article 18): "The employer periodically gives the employees the opportunity to undergo an examination aimed at preventing or reducing the risks that work entails for the health of the employees as much as possible. to limit."

Who performs the PMO?

The health and safety service provider carries out the PMO. They invite the employees individually for a PMO. The employee then completes a questionnaire. The basis for these questions are the RI&E and the objective of the PMO. The questions focus on working in the hospitality industry and specifically on the company.

In addition to a questionnaire, you can also choose to offer the employees an additional physical examination. This is not mandatory, but it can provide more insight into the mental and physical health of your employees. Examples of such additional examinations are, for example, BMI, heart film, hearing test, vision, blood pressure, cholesterol, etc. The results are discussed with the employee by the health expert of the occupational health service provider. In response to an individual PMO, an occupational health physician can advise and guide an employee. The employer receives a report and analysis based on the group data. If necessary, the occupational health physician can advise on the measures to be taken in response to the group data. These measures can be included in the RI&E and applied in the workplace.

Do all employees have to participate in a PMO?

It is important that employees understand the importance of a PMO, after all it is about their own health and job satisfaction, but the employees are not obliged to participate in a PMO. An employee does not want to take up the offer for a PMO? In that case, have him/her confirm in writing that he will not agree to this, so that there is proof that you as an employer have complied with the legal obligation to offer the employee a PMO.

Who pays the costs?

The costs for a PMO are for the employer, but offering a PMO is standard under the basic contract with the Occupational Health and Safety Service. The occupational health and safety service provider can inform you about the frequency, conditions, options and costs of a PMO.

Occupational health policy

By mapping the health of employees and the risks of their work, you can take preventive measures to prevent or reduce absenteeism. Think, for example, of reducing the burden on older employees or preventing burnout complaints. A sick employee costs an average of 250 euros per day in wages, replacement, loss of turnover and reintegration.

In addition to the fact that by offering a PMO you gain insight into the health of the employee and thus possibly save costs, you are legally obliged to ensure that your employees can perform their work healthily and safely. To this end, you draw up an occupational health and safety policy for your company. This in consultation with the employers' council or staff association. The working conditions policy consists in any case of a risk inventory and evaluation (RI&E), sick leave policy, company emergency response officers (ERO), the appointment of a prevention officer and a periodic medical examination (PMO).

Read also

A sexually tinted comment, a stare or an unwanted touch... Sexual intimidation unfortunately also occurs in the catering industry. As an employer, you want to do everything you can to prevent this. But how do you do that? KHN has drawn up a model protocol for undesirable behavior and house rules and rules of conduct.

Research by Arboportaal shows that one in ten employees in the Netherlands occasionally suffers from sexual intimidation. Even a harmless comment can have a much bigger impact than expected. Forms of sexual harassment also take place in the hospitality industry. As an employer, you naturally want to prevent this. KHN has drawn up a model protocol for undesirable behaviour.

Model protocol for undesirable behaviour

Establishing a protocol to prevent undesirable behavior that includes a complaints procedure is one of the measures you can take as an employer. The scheme must be accessible to your employees. The approval of the Works Council/employee representation is required for the implementation of the policy. Read more about applying a Model Protocol for Undesirable Behavior here .

KHN House control board

For your guests: House rules and rules of conduct 'Our house rules!'

To point out to your guests your house rules and rules of conduct in your business, KHN has developed house rule signs that you can order. Would you like to order a House Rules Sign (in Perspex)? You can do this easily via info@khn.nl (the costs are 10 euros excluding VAT).

Unexpectedly, emergency situations can arise in a company. In such cases, it is important to know what measures must be taken to bring employees, guests and yourself to safety. This is described and recorded in a disaster plan or company emergency plan.

Content plan

The emergency plan must include:

  • Names plus phone numbers of emergency responders
  • All emergency numbers
  • Where the fire extinguishers and first aid equipment are available
  • How staff instructing works
  • Who takes action to evict
  • Who reports the emergency to the emergency services
  • Where emergency maps and maps are located
  • What to do in the event of a bomb threat, terrorist actions, disturbances and the like

What it comes down to is that a disaster plan must consist of: instructions, an instruction plan, alarm, the assembly point and drawings.

Mandatory appointment of emergency response officer

The Working Conditions Act also stipulates that you are obliged - in addition to having an emergency plan - to appoint an emergency response officer. You will find more information about the rules for emergency response officers here .

Ask?

Do you want to know more? Please contact the advisors of KHN Advies on 0348 48 94 89 or by email: khnadvies@khn.nl .